New Music: Open Your Eyes by Katherine Fredricks & Stephen Bennett

In a lifetime spent – by preference – in the woods, I’ve faced danger a few times.  Rock climbing, and having the rock I was holding onto break off in my hand.  Accidentally walking between a mother elk and her calf.  Breaking through the ice, while crossing a stream on a winter camping trip.

The Oregon fires last fall were the first time I ever felt all humanity was directly endangered.  Listening to the news, I heard an Oregon firefighter say, he felt like he was fighting the whole world.  The first thought that leapt into my mind was, “Yeah, but who started this fight?”

I’ve believed we were in a human-caused climate emergency for years.  The wildfires of 2020 brought it home to me.  I was working as a temp for a chiropractor, watching the sky turn red overhead, as patient after patient called to cancel their appointments: “I can’t come in!  I’m being evacuated!”

I spoke to one eighty year old man, as he watched flames approach his home.  He didn’t want to leave.  His son was arguing with him: “You can’t fight a firestorm with a garden hose!”

So I sent texts for Joe Biden and was thrilled when he was elected.  I write my Congressional  Representatives regularly on climate issues.  

Last week, I was happy to receive a newsletter from Congressman Blumenauer, saying that he is working with Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on legislation to mandate the declaration of a national climate emergency. Read article here.

Last fall, watching fire clouds tower over me, I began writing a song, Open Your Eyes!  Composer Stephen Bennett related to it instantly, because his parents live in California, where similar fire clouds threatened their home.  Thank you to the members of Climate Reality, and to all people of good will and good science, who are working hard to (as Congressman Blumenauer puts it) “halt, reverse, mitigate, and prepare for the consequences of this climate crisis.”

LISTEN TO “OPEN YOUR EYES”

New Music: Without Shared Facts

Guest post by Katherine Fredricks

After the assault on the US Capital, we are all grateful to the courts, the election officials, the police and the military for protecting America from a failed insurrection.  Unfortunately, the long term effects of misinformation and disinformation will not disburse as quickly as the Capital rioters.

I’m a member of the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).  Back in 2015,  UCS invited all their members to a webinar by Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Neela Banerjee.  Her research showed that Exxon has known for decades that climate change was real, human caused, and potentially catastrophic. READ MORE HERE  

During that webinar, one of the speakers pointed out that the disinformation tactics used by Exxon were exactly the same as those used by tobacco companies, when they fought lawsuits against cigarettes.  “They know these tactics failed, so what will they try instead?”

We’ve seen what they tried.  They stacked the courts.  

Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s father was an executive for Royal Dutch Shell. READ MORE HERE

According to EcoWatch, Brett Kavanaugh “accepts the science behind climate change, but has ruled against the Environmental Protection Agency’s attempts to do anything about it.”  READ MORE HERE

According to American Progress, Justice Gorsuch “did not appear on President Trump’s first list of potential Supreme Court nominees in May 2016, but he appeared on Trump’s second list just weeks after writing a judicial manifesto arguing that judges should have more power to strike down federal regulations.” READ MORE HERE

And although the disinformation surrounding the 2020 Presidential election may have more to do with Trump’s ego than big oil, the disinformation handbook continues to be used by multinational corporations to protect their profits at the expense of human health and safety. READ MORE HERE

In response to all this disinformation and to the recent siege of the Capital, composer Stephen Bennett & I wrote a new song.  We hope you enjoy it.

LISTEN HERE

Katherine Brann Fredricks has had 6 shows in NYC festivals in the last 8 years, winning or nominated for 28 Awards.  https://katherine-b-fredricks.squarespace.com/ 

Stephen Wagener Bennett is a writer, composer, director, and dramaturg based in Brooklyn. He has written for new and experimental theatre for the last decade, and holds an MFA from NYU’s Graduate Musical Theatre Writing Program. stephenwagenerbennett.com

Oregon Environmental Efforts Reflect Nationwide Trends

The Oregon Climate Action Plan, Executive Order 20-04, was signed in March of this year. Defining the rules that will implement these proposed environmental standards–designing the specifics and practical applications of the standards–is now in progress in Oregon.

Oregon joins the voices and outreach of diverse nationwide groups to establish common ground that will lead to both environmental and economic health for our citizens. Nationwide, environmental groups are forming coalitions with other environmental groups. But also, group previously divided by politics or region are establishing common ground.

For example, Wisconsin farmers and environmental groups are partnering to facilitate the joint efforts and resources of their state. This partner group includes the Dairy Business Association, as well as Clean Wisconsin, The Nature Conservancy in Wisconsin, and Wisconsin Land and Water Conservation Association.

“Together, our organizations are proposing a set of policy principles to guide lawmakers and the administration in this effort,” says Dairy Business Association President Tom Crave.

The Wisconsin partnering is reported by the mid-western Brownfield Ag News for America. https://brownfieldagnews.com/news/dairy-group-three-environmental-groups-form-water-quality-partnership/

This is where we all agree!
Photo by Melissa Askew on Unsplash

When seeking and establishing common ground, we can learn practical strategies and ideas from other states, like Wisconsin. We can also strengthen the diverse partnerships already being developed in Oregon. As we in Oregon proceed to weigh in on rules to implement our Oregon Climate Action Plan, we aim to leverage our best. We join heart and hard-won efforts of diverse groups in our nation and the world.

Yes, We Can! Master Recycler Program in Oregon

Awesome Environmental Solution Where
You Can Help

Positive thinking is living in the solution, not the problem. When faced with environmental damage, let’s use the real, tangible, already available solutions to turn negative into positive.

There is a place in Oregon this fall to learn actions that can sustain our planet—aka the 3 R’s:  Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. This virtual 10-week class examines landfill science, composting, electronic and hazardous waste disposal, and costs and benefits of recycling.

RECYCLE — Recycling and using this cardboard means that a tree or two doesn’t need to be cut down. The trees we saved use their photosynthesis to use up the extra CO2 emissions in the air. Oh, and we also saved the costs to cut down the trees and manufacture new cardboard. Photo by Jon Moore, Unsplash.

The Master Recyclers Program (MRP) explores how wise materials management can decrease the amount of stuff we use, and then waste, to begin with.

Voila! The need, and costs, to recycle are decreased at the beginning of the consumption cycle.

REUSE — When we reuse materials in our life, that saves purchasing multiple items that would go to the landfill. This means less money spent on recycling.
Photo by Wynand Van Poortvliet, Unsplash.

Oregon State University and Republic Services facilitators are guiding this annual 10-week program.  Tino Barreras is Republic’s Education and Outreach facilitator for Linn and Benton counties. Andrea Norris brings her expertise as Marketing and Development Coordinator for OSU’s Campus Recycling.

Please note:  This fall’s Linn/Benton program is currently full.  In Oregon, however, Master Recycler Programs are held statewide; please check the Resources section at the end of this article for other MRP opportunities.

Highlighting Diversity Expands Outreach

The current Master Recyclers program welcomes diverse participants to learn how recycling aids sustainability. 

This online class is free to Linn and Benton County residents who commit to share their learning with 30 hours of volunteer outreach, within a year of course completion.

“It’s exciting that the online class will extend the reach of who can participate,” said Republic’s Barreras.  “It’s a diverse group, who will work in small groups and get to know each other.”

Volunteer activities can include: staffing an information table at a local market or event, leading a workshop, talking to neighbors and local groups, or pitching in at a recycle or re-use organization.

It’s a diverse group, who will work in small groups and get to know each other. Each participant will take their knowledge into their wider community. It’s an ever-expanding network.”  

Tino Barreras, Republic Services

The trained volunteers will be able to present pathways of change so people of all ages know that individual efforts—like what to recycle, what not to recycle—have a tangible effect on climate health. 

Originally an in-person class in previous years, this MRP class meets on Zoom: Mondays, 6-8pm, Sept 28 to Dec 7 (no class Nov. 23).   Discussion and question sessions will be held on two Thursdays, Oct 22 and Nov 19, 6-7pm.


Individual efforts—like what to recycle, what not to recycle—have a tangible effect on climate health.


Subject Matter Experts Bring Experience, Enthusiasm

The course structure uses an overview of recycle processes that most of us are familiar with, but are not sure exactly how much they make a difference.  So many questions:

  • What happens to those recycles I put in my bin? 
  • When waste goes to the landfill, how long is it expected to stay there? 
  • Does composting make a difference?

The professionals will share solutions they see on the horizon, but will also encourage participants to share solution ideas from their perspectives.

Waste Professionals Seek Community Ideas

“Each participant will take their knowledge into their wider community.  It’s an ever-expanding network,” Barreras said.

From campus-wide to community-wide, sustainability is honed by understanding and connection among people. The Master Recycler Program’s new online format will also support breaking into small groups to get to know people and learn about ideas and challenges of others.  Joining with other will widen the circle of influence of positive environmental change.

Materials Management and Waste Prevention

The lifecycle of waste, from extraction or growth to end of life, is the big picture of this class. Remember the 3 R’s to a sustainable planet—Reduce, Re-use, Recycle.  Recycling processes are only part, albeit a critical part, of the bigger material management picture. Re-use means using a material or a product again for another purpose or even for the same purpose.  Reduce means to re-use or to avoid purchasing; this leads to no waste—i.e., zero waste.

Zero waste–that is, no waste to start with—is the ultimate recycle strategy. Reducing our purchases eliminates money needed to (1) extract resource, transport; (2) manufacture, transport; (3) sell, transport; (4) trash, transport; (5) bury or burn. Carbon emissions decrease.

A Master Recycler learns the first step to recycling is to ask:
“Do I really need to buy this?”

Buying and trading will always be a way of interchange and economy vitality. However, both businesses and buyers will want to consider carefully what products they want to support in our local and global marketplace.

REDUCE — If we consider carefully what items we buy at the beginning of the consumer cycle, then we will lighten the recycling load–and thus the cost–needed at the end of the cycle.
Photo by Pop & Zebra, Upsplash.

Sustainability and MRP Are Statewide

Both individuals and businesses in Oregon have resources and ideas to both build our economy, and protect the environment as we move forward.

Here in Oregon, a viable, active program of education, participation, and outreach is embodied in the Master Recycler Programs. The MRP classes and resources can be found throughout the state of Oregon, by searching on your web browser.  The classes are sponsored by a diverse combination of private and public organizations, depending on the region.

Feel free to use the following resources to learn how waste recycling and management supports our economy and environment at the same time.

Oregon Business and Science Joint Environmental Resources

Linn & Benton Master Recyclers’ Program:

  • Andrea Norris, 541-737-5398
    Marketing & Development Coordinator, Oregon State University Campus Recycling
  • Tino Barreras, 541-286-3331
    Municipal Administrator/Education & Outreach, Republic Services

Republic and OSU Sustainability Links

Master Recycler Program– Inspire Neighbors and Coworkers Into Action

Upcoming:  Yes You Can! Fishing Regulations Reveal Global Buy-In by Oregon

  • Fishing collaboration with other states, countries—lead to sustainability
  • Oregon Initiatives and Resources

Yes We Can! October Solutions

Climate Reality SW Oregon Chapter
Presents
“Yes, We Can!” Climate Solutions

Local efforts. Global efforts. Efforts through science, industry, government initiatives, individual initiatives. This section delivers positive solutions we can learn about, share with others, and support. Read on and see where you can join in on making a livable climate.

Save the planet?! Yes, we can!

Each One of Us Makes a Climate Difference

Self-doubt can dog us all. We all can wonder the following: What can I really do anyway? Does my vote really count? If I delete a phishing email, does it really block the worm that could open the channel to my company’s data and finances? Is there anything really, that I can personally do to change the global climate for the better? The answer is yes.

For all the negative environmental impacts that that destroy ecosystems and atmosphere, and ratchet up a cascade of climate damage, there are practical solutions that we can do to start healing the earth and our climate.

Once we marshal the facts and get a grasp of positives as well as the negatives of climate reality, we will understand that yes, we can save the world. One person can make a difference. A group of people can make a difference.

Integrate Solutions into every Climate Endeavor

This feature section of the Climate Reality SW Oregon Chapter will highlight the solutions that we can do to change the diagnosis for the Earth’s health from dismal to fit. Some of these solutions are in place and can be done today. Some are on the drawing board. Teams of
community, science, government, and individuals are coordinating and collaborating on positive changes.

Stay in Solution, Stay Inspired

Two “gung ho” concepts to get us moving toward solutions:
(1) Remember the three R’s—Reduce, Re-use, Recycle.
(2) Remember the three S’s—Speak up, Share knowledge and resources, Show others how it is done!

The best environmental book on individual effort making a difference is George Saves the World by Lunchtime by Jo Readman and Ley Honor Roberts. This intergenerational story illustrates how George and his Grandpa “save the world” between breakfast and lunch.
How?
> They reduce—use less gas by cycling.
> They re-use—say goodbye to old clothes, books, and toys; they repair items instead of buying new.
> They recycle—they sort plastic, cans, glass, and paper so they can be made into new products.
Super-hero capes are optional!

Your effort. My effort. Global efforts. Our efforts. This section is to remind us that we can positively impact the environment. No action is too little when done with environmental intention for healing.

Start small, or start big, but start learning, acting, and speaking up to heal the planet!

Upcoming “Yes, We Can!” Solutions Post

First solution story will look at the Master Recycler Program (MRP) in Oregon, as demonstrated by the current MRP program sponsored for Linn and Benton Counties in the Willamette Valley. A Fall 2020 Master Recycler Program, jointly facilitated by Oregon State
University Campus Recycling and Republic Services of Corvallis, started its 10-week online training on Sept 28.

Article by Molly Minahan Miller